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201 01/15
Notes in RG STANTON papers (General Information/ HEATH) suggest that Mary's mother (Hannah) died when Mary was just 6 years old (i.e. c1876)

Rosina BEATON (Hannah's stepdaughter) married in 1875. The marriage certificate is signed by J Beaton and by "E" Beaton. Did Hannah go by a different forename or is this some other relative of John?

09/11
Unable to locate "Hannah BEATON; bc1833" in the 1881 census or beyond. Nor in any passenger lists.

06/11
Henry BABSTOCK is listed on the 1871 census as "step-son" of the Head (John George BEATON). Presumably this is Hannah's son from a previous relationship.

04/10
A letter from Roger Heath notes that Hannah died c1876 when Mary was only 6 yrs old.

01/01 Mervyn
Hannah, whose Christian name the family cousins had thought was 'Margaret' - come to think of it, she was a singer (from Wales) so 'Margaret' might well have been her 'stage name'. Her real name was Hannah Brumwell; she was Nan's mother's mother, married to John George Beaton (cabinet-maker, piano-maker and himself a gifted musician), and on 24 June 1870 ('our Grandma', 'Mary's', birth-date) they were living at 3 Market Street, Bloomsbury, Middlesex (now Camden, London, I believe). I now have a copy of Mary Beaton's birth certificate, so at last this information is now official.

07/06
1881Census- 42 Queens Road, Kensington, London, Middlesex, shows :
John G.Beaton, 52, Pianoforte Maker, b.Jersey, Channel Islands;
Margaret Beaton, 48, wife, b.Lavernock, Glamorgan, Wales; (Mary's step-mother)
Mary Beaton, 10, daur. ,scholar, b.Bloomsbury, Middlesex, England;
Robert Gray, 18, nephew, Oilmans Assistant. ,b.Dorset, England.
 
Hannah BRUMWELL
 
202 09/11
Hannah may not have been Charles BRUMWELL's daughter. It looks like Hannah (Charles' wife) had her eldest daughter well before she married Charles. Unless they just took their time getting married! Their other 3 children came after the marriage date. 
Hannah BRUMWELL
 
203 09/11
Unable to locate "Jane BRUMWELL, bc1857" in the 1881 census or beyond. 
Jane BRUMWELL
 
204 06/11
1851 census lists William BRUMWELL as Richard's grandson. At present it is not clear who William is the son of? One of the daughters? A son who is not living with them? Need to follow William in future census.
Unable to locate "Richard BRUMWELL; bc1787" in the 1861 census or beyond. 
Richard BRUMWELL
 
205 The address on the 1861 census has been transcribed as
"The Tanhouse, The Row, Rhandir" 
Richard BRUMWELL
 
206 09/11
Unable to locate "Thomas BRUMWELL, bc1865" on the 1891 census or beyond. 
Thomas Arthur BRUMWELL
 
207 09/11
1861 census William BRUMWELL is recorded living with his grandfather William BASON. 
William BRUMWELL
 
208 10/11
Census records for Thomas BUNYARD get a little confused before 1871. 1861 census has a number of Thomas BUNYARD's born around the same time and all in Maidstone. Certificates will be needed to confirm the more likely record.
 
Thomas BUNYARD
 
209 Location of Rockland Cottage on census is between Lucerne Street and Jeffrey Street (presumably on what is now Wheeler Street). Thomas BUNYARD
 
210 John Thomas may have taken his father's second surname "BRENCHLEY" in certain records. Thomas John BUNYARD
 
211 Died while a child of menningitis Brenda Margaret BURKE
 
212 Served in WW1 where was victim of gas but survived. Died of heart trouble. John BURKE
 
213 "In Loving Memory" "Also of his brother" "Charles Morris 17th R. Fus." Alick CAMPBELL
 
214 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
215 03/15
http://partleton.co.uk/Charles1839b.htm for photographs of the area around Vauxhall Row where Charles and family lived. 
Charles Morris CAMPBELL
 
216 03/15
There is a marriage for Charles Morris CAMPBELL to a Mary Ann ABBOTT recorded at St Mark's Kennington (21 Aug 1826). Witnessed by a "Mary Ann Morris CAMPBELL". A Mary Ann CAMPBELL b1805 is then buried in St Mary at Lambeth on 25th May 1830. This would fit before the marriage of Charles and Louisa.
Unsure whether this is "our" Charles Morris CAMPBELL since he is noted on his marriage certificate to Louisa BLOODWORTH as a "Bachelor" rather than "Widower".

Following on... discovered the birth of Mary Ann CAMPBELL to Charles and Mary Ann (Sep 1829). Then the burial of Mary Ann CAMPBELL aged 25 (of Brothers Row) 25th May 1830, then burial of Mary Ann CAMPBELL aged 1 (of Brothers Row) 6th June 1830. So it seems Mary Ann and her baby died within days of each other. Brothers Row is not too distant from where Charles Morris CAMPBELL was living 3 years later in 1833 when Frederick Robert was baptised. So it seems a good bet that this is Charles Morris' first wife and child.

http://partleton.co.uk/Charles1839b.htm for photographs of the area around Vauxhall Row and Brothers Row (now under the National Maritime Building) where Charles and family lived.

10/11
Unable to locate "Charles CAMPBELL bc1806" on the census beyond 1851.

06/11
Charles was a Lighterman, which is the name given to the men who worked on the Thames barges. The 1841 census has a lodger living with Charles and his family. "William CHITTY" who was a bargebuilder. 
Charles Morris CAMPBELL
 
217 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Campbell_(rower)
Charles Campbell of Westminster was the first recognised Professional World Champion Single Sculler. At the time, (1831) he became the Champion of the Thames which was effectively the Champion of England although the Tyne scullers might have disagreed. See Also English Sculling Championship. After the English title gained the world status in 1876, earlier winners were retrospectively given the World Champion Title.

Campbell was born in 1805 at Lambeth. During his racing career he was stated to be 5 ft 7 in tall, and weighed 11 st 7 lb. His races included pair and four oar events as well as single sculls.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Sculling_Championship
The first race for the Professional Championship of the Thames took place between Westminster and Hammersmith, on the River Thames in London in September 1831, when John Williams of Waterloo Bridge challenged Charles Campbell of Westminster for the Sculling Championship of the Thames. 
Charles Morris CAMPBELL
 
218 Vine Terrace, Waterloo Road, LAMBETH

http://www.census1891.com/streets-v.htm 
Charles Morris CAMPBELL
 
219 At least one living individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living
 
220 06/11
By 1901 Dora had begun work at her Grandmother's (Elizabeth Goodwin) shop at 40 Priory Grove Lambeth. 
Dora A CAMPBELL
 
221 07/07
Extract from recorded interview with Douglas CAMPBELL (DC) and his wife Irene (IC) in 1984:

DC: That was just after the first world war. I was 5. And I can still remember (inaudible) giving me half a crown
JS: Gosh and that would have been a lot in those days!
DC: Yes. She gave me half a crown, and I never did get that half a crown!
IC: Well who had it?
DC: Eh?
IC: Who had it?
DC: Our Salmon! (laughter) Mum gave it to Salmon to go and buy a drink with and I never got it! I never did get it!
IC: Oh! What a shame!
AS: What year would that have been?
DC: Well I was about 5 well I was born in '17 so it would have been about '22 '23. And May was 15 when she went out to America
AS: She moved to America?
DC: She went out with our Bets(?)

AS: And as a fireman what did you find yourself doing there?
DC: Putting fires out (laughter) on tanks. Tanks and things like that.
AS: Naples was held by the British?
DC: Oh we didn't stay in Naples we went up we was always in front line. We was always with ammunition.
AS: Oh I see.
DC: You know standing by for ammunition fires and all that. Or if there was a tank fire we had to go out to the tank and put it out, all that sort of thing.
JS: Gosh! Must have been quite hairy musn't it?
IC: Well it was once, you wrote didn't you Doug? You told me you nearly got blown up?
DC: Oh I can't remember.
IC: Yes, you said it was something quite near you you said it was a bit scary.
DC: Well once we went right behind the German line didn't we we didn't know where we were! The military police came after us and turned us back!
IC: You were advanced quicker than your advance guard!
DC: Oh you are talking about when we was in Fourly(?)
IC: Yes. You said something about you either it just went in front of you or just behind you and made a great big hole!
DC: We were in was it Fourly or Fienze? No Fourly. We were stationed on the outskirts of the town. And you could see on the mountain, there was a railway, and on the hill, they used to, the Germans used to bring the gun out on the train fire a few shots, and go back in the tunnel. And we was all standing on watching, on the corner of our where we had our vehicles. And we saw the flash the next minute it landed right in between the lot of us. And it killed two Italian soldiers who was walking across the road never touched any of us!
JS: Gosh!
IC: Yes I remember you telling me about... well writing about that.
DC: It killed two of them across the road it must have the shock went that way and the shrapnel and killed those two, and never touched any of us. It landed right in the middle of us! Marvellous really!
IC: Strange isn't it? When things happen like that? What is it?
DC: Oh we had nearer scrapes than that in London!
IC: Oh yes being in the fire service in London.
DC: We was in the Queen Victoria Street. That's by Ludgate Circus, by the Times newspaper.
AS: This was what during the blitz?
DC: I was on the pump then.
AS: During the blitz?
DC: Yes. I was on the pump then. At night, but in the morning, just on the middle of the square, there was a great big landmine hanging from the telegraph wires! Not well 20 yards away from us!
JS: Crumbs! That hadn't gone off?
AS: It just got caught there?
DC: It had caught, the parachute had caught, and it was hanging there!
IC: Well how did they get it down?
DC: Eh? Oh the wassname the bomb disposal.
And another time we were going along through Mile End, and as we were going along, a bomb hit a house, and we saw the house, we was going along one, and we looked back and saw the house split down, split right the way down like that! As it went through?. Oh it was terrible!
IC: You had so many hours on so many hours off didn't you? And I was working in Adelphi House wasn't I?
DC: We used to do 24 on? 24 on and 12 off
IC: and erm after this terrible night, you know I was worried about dad, and we went into work as usual but all our windows had been blown out and the place was covered in glass and they sent us home, so I thought well I'll go round to dads station and see if he's alright you know. And the roads were covered in hoses you know
JS: Were you married then?
DC: I was up Shoe Lane then.
IC: Were we married? Were we married then?
DC: Yes, course we were!
IC: We were married then
And I was picking my way over all these things.
DC: We used to live up Haines(?) We lived up Haines(?).
and when I found dad, he was all black and dirty and I think you looked half drunk, were you half drunk with tiredness? Or had you had a drink? ...that night? Was that the night when you found the whisky and you all had a drink to try and keep you going?
DC: No, I don't think so we'd just come in, as you were walking down the road we were coming in.
IC: Oh? you looked dreadful? and you know it was awful that? was horrible... And now I can't remember whether we were married or not
DC: We were! We lived at frames(?)
IC: Oh in the furnished rooms?
We got married in the first year of the army
Oh yes that's right.
DC: The first few months when I were in the army.
Don't you remember when they
JS: Weren't you on the 24 hour leave and you took a bit longer and missed pay!
IC: That's right
DC: Yes! I lost 7 days pay for that!
AS: Why? Because you took another day?
DC: No I took... not another day no I got back next morning instead of that night
They wouldn't let me go... that was Frank Salmon wasn't it?
IC: They wouldn't let him go back we actually had gone on the bus hadn't we to go back to the station? I was going to see you off.
DC: Yes old Frank Salmon that was.
IC: And he said No he said come on your going to have a night at home he said you go back in the morning!
AS: And then you lost 7 days pay for it!
IC: 7 days 7 days pay was it?
DC: Something like that.

JS: So how did you come to get into Italy you just? you don't have any choice?
DC: Oh well after the blitz they called all the soldiers back.
IC: Well your seconded aren't you from one to the other.
DC: You're only lent to the fire service.
IC: You're only lent to the when they need you. As dad was in the auxiliary fire service before the war started you see and then when the war came you were called up into it weren't you Doug?
DC: Called up into the army
IC: into the army
DC: Oh no! I went straight into the fire service
IC: into the fire service that's right
DC: At the outbreak of war I went into the fire service
IC: Then of course nothing happened much you see there wasn't the air raids and the incendaries and everything and dad was called up in the army. And then cause when the blitz on London, anybody who'd been in the fire service, they called both of them out from the army into the fire service again while all that terrible trouble was on. And then you went back into the army again didn't you dear after that?
DC: Then when we went back we went back into the army part they called us the army fire service.
IC: Into the army fire service then.
DC: To go over there.
IC: So? you know he did a bit all round the place/
JS: Did you go via ship or fly?
DC: Oh yes!
Ship! Yes that was an experience wasn't it? He said that was dreadful was it the Bay of Biscay Doug where you know you saw the sea right up here once and oh!
I got a job I had a job right away, I got a job in the cookhouse I never saw anything higher than a (inaudible) (laughter)
IC: That figures!
DC: They went out near to America and then round it was terrific in the sea you know you had a destroyer escort with you and you were up here and you couldn't see any destroyer and then you was down there and the destroyer was up there! Oh it was terrific! (laughter)
JS: Were you ever sea sick?
DC: (shakes head)?
JS: No?!
DC: And then of course I done well I come back I done well. I got stores they give me stores and I left the cookhouse but then we had no food when we got to Italy so I had to use it for our? people. Otherwise the chap said to me the cook said you'll be alright when we get to Italy you'll be able to flog it for a nice little bit! (laughter) I had about 3 tins of corned beef like that and tins of fruit I filled me kit bag up from the ship's stores!
JS: But you ended up having to give it away?
DC: And I had to give it. Well you couldn't starve could you? We shared it amongst ourselves.
IC: He used to go out on the prowl at night looking for chickens and eggs and all these things like you see in these films you know!
DC: Yes!
IC: To suppliment their food!
AS: What there just wasn't enough food out there?
DC: Well see? you landed at transit camp
IC: I suppose it was waiting for it to come up
DC: And you'd wait for your food to come so we had to use what food we had.
IC: What was around you or what you could find? beg, steal or borrow!
DC: But every Christmas out there? each Christmas out there cause my sergeant major was a friend of the downstairs(?) storesman.
AS: So you were known?
DC: So I was alright and I was the quartermaster was a Scotsman and I was a Campbell! So all three of used to get on well together
IC: Good job he wasn't a MacDonald!
JS: Or a MacGregor!
DC: No, what was his name? It was Jock MacGregor!
IC: Oh was it!
AS: And you still got on well!
DC: Yes it was a Jock MacGregor.
IC: It was the MacDonalds that were.
DC: Even I even I (inaudible) oh I had a MacDonald! We had a MacDonald there and we had a Stuart, and it was the Stuart who was going to do me cause I won his money! (laughter) Didn't like it! We always used to get together the three of us and the other chap. And the Quartermaster, Sergeant, and anything we wanted like chickens, in Gratz we used to go out round the farms and try to knock 'em off! (laughter)
IC: Oh dear!
DC: But trouble was most of the turkeys and that you know get up in trees. They did Yes! We went to one farm. the Sergeant major was up the tree getting hold of it, and the bloke come out with a shotgun and attacked him! (laughter)
Anyway we finished up with quite a small farmyard! (laughter)
AS: Yes!
IC: What producing your own eggs were you?!
DC: No eggs?! We ate them for Christmas! We had a couple of geese, couple of turkeys, and a few chickens. Oh he was a terror that Sergeant Major!
JS: Did you stay out there then till the end of the war?
DC: Yes. Oh well no we went all the way up
IC: Trieste you were at weren't you?
DC: We were the first troops into Trieste and then we went into Austria. We were with the front line troops all the way as the front line moved up we moved up with them all the time. We was on the move all the time we hardly ever stopped.
AS: So the front you were on was one of the front's which forced Hitler to take his power off the Western front?
DC: Yeah yeah
AS: To go down to defend himself against Austria and against Poland in the North the Russians coming down from the north

IC: You ought to tell 'em I don't know whether you've told them before the story of the piano in Austria!
DC: Oh yeah
IC: Have you heard that?
AS: The story of the piano in Austria?
JS: I haven't heard these stories and I've been dying to know!
DC: There was three of us who always used to go out together when we was in Gratz.
AS: This is in Austria
DC: And we were walking along one day and a woman come up to us and said could you give us a hand help us. She was Austrian, but she spoke English and she said Yeah just to move a piano she said we're going to move it to the naffy(?) for you to have a concert tonight.
DC: Ah well, we said yeah we'll help you. What we didn't know was the piano was 5 floors up! (laughter) in a block of flats and not only that it was a Grand Piano!
JS: Oh no! (laughter)
DC: And oh well we got up there and there was nothing we could do about it. We got it down, and we had an old boy with us, who was going to move it into his lorry. He was an old boy but he showed us how to move it, he had a webbing, it was quite easy to move down but we got it down anyway, and we got it in the lorry and we said that's it. The lorry goes off and we're in it? the first time it come to a stop we all jumped off! So whether she ever got that out of the (laughter)
IC: Probably found another lot of soldiers wherever it was going!
DC: Oh! It nearly killed us it did! 5 floors! A giant a full size grand piano! Cor dear!
IC: How many of you 3?!
DC: When we saw it we should have run!
IC: Just 3 of you did it?!
DC: Yeah! Well, and this old boy but he wasn't much good! Cor dear!
IC: You see war isn't fighting all the time is it? Those kind of conventional wars, I mean different now if there was an atomic war or anything
DC: Well no that war, the last war was different from the first world war there was no trench warfare you was on the move all the time you never knew whether you was in front or behind the Germans you know? Course we never saw any Germans except for that gun coming out, we never saw any. Except for those we captured that were coming back.
Because it was a moving you know a fast moving war all the time.

JS: So when the war ended when did you come back?
DC: Pardon
JS: When the war ended you came back then did you?
DC: Well the war ended on the? when did it end June wasn't it?
AS: Was it June '45?
DC: June '45? well we went up to Austria then cause we was in Trieste when the war, as the war ended yeah. We was in Trieste. We was first troops in Trieste, with partisans from Yugoslavia. We joined up with them? Then about 3 weeks after that we moved back to Venice, and left an army unit there (inaudible). And then went on to Gratz into Austria.
IC: And did you come home from there?
DC: I came home in the February didn't I?
IC: Yeah but did you come home from there?
DC: Gratz yeah.
AS: What you flew home?
DC: Nah? Train
IC: 3 days on the train
DC: 3 days on the train? on one of those wooden seats you know?!
JS: Oh! (laughter)
DC: All they? you know you got on the train with your luggage. And every so often they'd pull up and you'd get out the train and have a meal and get back in the train and shunt on again.
IC: And then how long did you have to stay in camp over here before you were demobbed?
DC: We come over in
Issued with our gear and I was home that evening.
IC: Oh golly. Gosh that was good.
JS: And then you have to pick up the threads of getting a job and everything again!
DC: Yeah. Oh no you have to go back to your own job
IC: I think your allowed to go back to you own job
DC: Oh yeah they'd keep your job open for you.
JS: So what job did you have then?
DC: Butcher
JS: You were a butcher?
AS: Were you a butcher? (inaudible) then?
IC: No. Thatch End, Morden.
DC: No
IC: What was the name?
DC: Frank Morden
IC: Morden?
DC: Yeah
IC: Very posh shop in Crouch End
DC: Oh? very posh!
IC: High class

JS: That's very interesting often though I've thought, you know cause Mark has asked, especially when we went to Mons and he was saying what did Grandad do?

AS: Shilling a day!
DC: That's what I got when I first went shilling a day.
AS: The children get that for a 5-day week for pocket money! 25p! (laughter)
IC: Yes!
DC: 7 bob a week. In fact we didn't draw 7 bob a week we used to draw 6. 6 and something. So they used to keep so much back every time. On top of that you pay a shilling for your blanket,
AS: Shilling for your?! Wait a minute shilling for your blanket that's a days pay for your blanket!
DC: Yeah. That was to bury you in!
IC: What every week you had to pay that shilling?
DC: Yeah. No you had to pay a shilling for your blanket to bury you in then they took that off and that was your first weeks pay
IC: Oh I see you just paid it the once?
DC: Yeah that was to bury you in in case you got shot. (laughter)
AS: In the meantime before you got shot could you sleep in this blanket? (laughter)
DC: No I should have had it back! 'ere that's a point I don't know if you. No! no!
AS: You never got it back?
DC: No
JS: (inaudible) I'm still here!
AS: You could write up to somebody for that!
DC: No I hadn't thought of that! I should have had it back!
IC: Now that's owing to him! Now that's a half a crown and a shilling still owing to him! (laughter)
DC: Do you know I don't even think they used to bury you in your boots? because we saw a bloke being buried in his blanket and he had no boots on.
AS: Reissue the boots! You reissue the boots
DC: No probably didn't do him cause he was probably Italian but they never they used to bury you where you dropped. And then the graves people would come afterwards and Italians would dig you up and pinch you boots wouldn't they?
Cause it was funny that cause going through one place our cook was a Liverpudlian. And what was the Liverpool army...? Forget the name what his lot was But his brother was a soldier and the place we stopped at one night his brother was buried in the garden.
JS: Oh no!
DC: And there was the old wooden stake with his brother's name on, and tin hat on.
JS: Oh that must have been awful mustn't it?

JS: And what regiment were you or what were you called originally?
DC: Me? I was first or all in the Royal Warwick's Andy would know them and then I went into the Royal Fusiliers then I finished up in the Royal Armed Service Corps.
JS: Have you got any sort of medals and things?
DC: Yeah
JS: Keep those cause Mark would be really interested to see them
DC: Well he can have them!
 
Douglas Roderick CAMPBELL
 
222 07/07

Extract from recorded interview with Douglas CAMPBELL (DC) and his wife Irene (IC) in 1984:

IC: ...ever such a nice, quiet.. ted was like him
JS: Yes, old uncle Ted
IC: Yes he was lovely
JS: Yes I remember crying my eyes out when he died, thought oh, he was such a lovely man. Very gentle. Wasn't he?
IC: So kind and gentle to everybody.
JS: Lovely blue eyes
DC: Old Ted?
JS: Yes
DC: Oh you didn't know Ted really.
JS: Oh we hardly ever saw him but what we did know of him he was lovely
DC: I can remember Ted!
JS: I remember when we stayed that fortnight he used to take us off to the park
DC: Yes. I can remember Ted every Friday going off with his barbells, down to the gym
IC: He used to do strongman stuff didn't he?
DC: He was a strongman
IC: He used to have lumps of concrete broken across his chest!
JS: Did he?! (laughter)
DC: He used to you know like those barbells with? like train wheels! A set of those walking down the road (laughter)
IC: He used to carry those along to the place! Where you'd take two with one of them!
DC: I couldn't lift the thing! He was a strong man!
JS: I wonder why he never got married? He was lovely wasn't he?
IC: We thought he was going to get married in the war didn't we? He fell in love with an Italian girl
DC: Oh, when I met him in Italy, he told me he had a girlfriend.
IC: But nothing came of it
JS: Oh I didn't realise he went out as well out there as well
AS: You met up in Italy did you? You met up with him in Italy?
DC: Yes. Well he used to be on the trains, he used to be the mailman
AS: The what?
DC: Mailman. He used to sort the mail on the trains from between Barry and Naples.
AS: Where's Barry?
DC: The other side of Italy. I landed at Naples, and I was stationed just outside of Naples for a little while, and I used to go up, when the train come in, he used to let me know when the train was coming in, and I used to go and meet him. Coz he invariably had no money nor cigarettes coz well he never had any money!
IC: No, well he gave everything away didn't he? Gave everything away
DC: And so I used to you know,,, give him cigarettes.
JS: And what did you do over there you were in the
DC: I was in the fire service, and he was the mailman. Well even then he had a couple of bad well he had one? I think it helped to kill him
IC: I think really he did die from something that he got over there.
DC: Coz he was in the desert and he got blown up in the desert and he also got blown up on the train in Italy. He was buried under the wassaname, the train was blown off the line and he was buried under all the trucks
AS: So was he serving in the desert as a mailman?
DC: He was serving in the desert in the army yes
AS: But as a mailman?
DC: Cook. No he was a cook.
 
Edward CAMPBELL
 
223 IC: Now its funny dads brothers Frank and Alec. Frank was in that terrible army in Burma, you know going through all the jungles and all that. Alec was on HMS somethingortheother in the navy.
DC: He was on an aircraft carrier.
IC: And they met up together
DC: Yeah
IC: Out in Burma didn't they Doug?
DC: Madras
IC: Madras
DC: What totally unexpected?
IC: Oh no? no I think they
AS: Oh they knew?
IC: ?they contacted each other? and asked their commanding officers you know
DC: They knew? if you knew? you could get in touch and then have your leave with them.
IC: And they did and they both come through unscathed? funny isn't it you know?
DC: Pip? was the only one who well Alec Frank was a bit mad. I'm sure he was mad.
JS: Yes. Something I remember you saying about what had happen that must have affected Frank
DC: Yeah he was mad.
JS: Was he taken prisoner or anything? Or was it just the fear and the...
DC: No but he... those chaps out in Burma suffered (inaudible)
IC: It's the weather and the. oh yes the terrible
DC: Cause he said to me once him and his mate was shot. They were going on patrol him and his mate and they passed over and a Jap came out of the ground and shot his mate.
JS: Oh!
DC: Frank killed him but I mean to say it unnerved him. He said they used to tie themselves to trees the Japs did, and shoot you, you know as you went through you'd never see them. Oh yeah I think they had a terrible time, he doesn't speak much about it.
IC: No, he got very thin didn't he those pictures we seen he got terribly thin, and of course is the very humid atmosphere out there too isn't it you know?
JS: Could you say I suppose you couldn't even say where you wanted to be
IC: Oh no no
JS: You just went in and they sent you?
DC: Well why Frank got pushed out there he was actually he was artillery man. And he went first on a command away to Norway and came back. And then they sent him to India. And Frank being (inaudible) so they put him straight into the infantry in the Cameron Highlanders.
IC: Oh that's why he come down
DC: Up to Burma. Straight up to into the Chindits(?)
 
Francis Victor CAMPBELL
 
224 10/11
Possible record for "Fred CAMPBELL bc1869, Bayswater" (Bayswater is in Paddington, his brother Charles also had Bayswater listed as his birthplace on the 1891 census). RG13 piece 47 folio 35 page 16. This Fred is living in Tabor Road, Hammersmith, and is married to Rose (nee WALKER - according to the 1901 census record). 
Frederick G CAMPBELL
 
225 10/11
Unable to locate "Frederick CAMPBELL bc1834" on the census beyond 1891. 
Frederick Robert CAMPBELL
 
226 Frederick became a Freeman of the River Thames on his completion of his 7 year Waterman apprenticeship. Frederick Robert CAMPBELL
 
227 07/07
Extract from recorded interview with Douglas CAMPBELL (DC) and his wife Irene (IC) in 1984:
DC: All I do know is my fathers' grandfather was a freeman of London!
IC: Were they the lighter-men? Coz Mum had lighter-men on the Thames some of her relatives weren't they?
DC: Yes, I know some are
DC: All I know is he was freeman of London I know, coz dad could have had that coz he was the eldest son.
IC: One of your mums children could have gone to the cap n gown school couldn't they?
DC: Yeah
IC: And in fact they got given a place
DC: You mean, Christ's College.
IC: Yes. Your mum called it the "cap n gown school"!
DC: Yes.
IC: You know the way she talked about these things!
DC: Yeah I don't know if you ever seen them they wore yellow stockings and.. or red stockings and a long cloak.
AS: They still do??
DC: Yes they still do! It's a college in London for children of the freemen of the city and all that you know?
JS: The freemen of the city that as you say can be passed on can it to your next...?
DC: It could ha' done yes.
JS: Why wasn't it?
DC: Coz dad never
IC: Never bothered him he never bothered about anything did he?!
DC: No He wouldn't bother about anything like that
He didn't like any fuss or anything like that (laughter)
IC: Or any form filling in or anything like that! (laughter)
DC: No well I don't! (laughter)
AS: Now we know where dad gets it from! (laughter)
DC: Inconspicuous
IC: Yes that's right that's right that's just it!
DC: He didn't want to know
IC: that's just it!
AS: His grandfather you were saying dad was the was involved in the Metropolitan police?
DC: He was on the mounted police yes the mounted side
AS: The mounted police? Yes so that means that's your great grandfather?
DC: Yes yes
AS: Was that before 1600 or?
DC: Ooh hoo! (laughter)
AS: Perhaps not! And there's something about lighter-men on your side somewhere as well.
DC: Yes quite a few of them were lighter-men
AS: And is that where the freemen of the city came in?
DC: Probably
IC: Something to do with these barges down the Thames and its quite a small knit profession to be in. I mean its still carried on today. In fact you (inaudible)? the night
DC: You've heard of the Coat and Doggett people?
JS: The what?
DC: The Coat and Doggett. they have the races on the Thames
JS: Oh..
IC: And that's all to do with the lighter-mens relatives
DC: every year. Their all to do with in the olden days when Henry the VIII, and King Charles come down the Thames on barges well the lighter-man supplied the rowers. And they all had special uniforms the Cloak and Doggett badge. They wear a red hat and red cloak and gold braid Or a scarlet coat and gold braid. They are the lighter-men of London. And they supplied the oarsmen to the royal barges. Of course they don't do it now do they? But they still hold the race every year
IC: They still hold the racing and the tradition in the main's still goes on...

Further research suggests that one of Frederick's relatives may have been a William Campbell... former winner of the Doggetts Coat and Badge race, and thus a Freeman of the City of London.
Doggetts Coat and Badge race winners:
1850 Campbell, William. District - Westminster
http://parishregister.com/winners.html

Thomas Doggett established a prize for watermen in their first year of apprenticeship, to be raced for on the Tideway in London (August 1), that is now one of the oldest, continually running athletic contests in the world. The Coat and Badge that were awarded brought fame, though little fortune, to the wearers, who were also eligible to man the Royal Barge on state occasions. http://www.rowinghistory.net/Time%20Line/TL%20-1849images.htm

Extract from recorded interview with Douglas CAMPBELL (DC) and his wife Irene (IC) in 1984:
DC: My dad used to be a French polisher.
JS: Yes. I remember you saying last time, I never knew what he did I think it's very interesting.
DC: He did all the stars, Nathan Johnson and all those
IC: Yes. He had a black piano once didn't he brought to him and the person wanted it white and he made a black piano white! Just by polishing it!
DC: He done the er Osbourne House. Piano for the Queen Victoria's Osbourne house
IC: ?on the Isle of Wight. When she went you know she was a recluse wasn't she when she lost her Albert.
DC: Well she wasn't Queen Victoria then it was George V then wasn't it? Or Edward. He used to do the pianos down there at Osbourne House on the Isle of Wight.
JS: Well he must have had a good job then. Well paid was he?
DC: Yes. Well he was a colour man.
IC: Colour polisher wasn't he?
DC: Whatever colour they wanted he'd mix himself (inaudible) polish.
The last chap he polished something for down in Salisbury he told mum it would last 20 years! When you polish a thing it lasts
JS: Funny that none of you took it up to do it as well?
DC: He wouldn't tell us how to do it.
IC: Why was that! Because it was too hard work?
DC: I wanted to know but he wouldn't tell us
IC: Why? Why Doug because it was too hard work?
DC: No, because he could see coming that there wouldn't be a trade(?)
IC: Oh I see that it was a dying industry
DC: That it was a dying industry only (inaudible) French polish.
JS: It's a shame though because you might have made a thing with it?

DC: What was it well I can remember my father bathing us we used to have a tin bath my father always used to bath us you know he used to put the bath on the table well he wasn't going to bend down he was too fat! (laughter)
IC: And to small short!
DC: All this sort of thing I can still see that now.

DC: But he was a funny old boy the old man lovely
IC: Oh he was lovely dad, yes. Ever such a nice, quiet.. ted was like him

JS: That's very interesting often though I've thought, you know cause Mark has asked, especially when we went to Mons and he was saying what did Grandad do?
DC: Oh my dad was there...
JS: Yeah. I wish we'd known! Known what they looked like because there was lots of photographs wasn't there, of all the soldiers that were in Mons.
DC: My father in the last war was a sniper
IC: Was he?!
DC: He got tuppence a day extra for that
IC: He was good with a gun then?
DC: Yeah yeah
JS: That's where I get it from then cause I'm good with a rifle aren't I! (laughter)
AS: Yes!
DC: That's why he took the job on because he got tuppence a day extra, instead of a shilling a day he got one and tuppence a day
AS: Shilling a day!
 
Frederick William CAMPBELL
 
228 06/11
1891 census has Henry's age incorrectly given as 21. It should be 31. The last census he appears on is the 1901 census.

02/08
Extract from tape recording with Douglas CAMPBELL and Andrew STANTON discussing Frederick CAMPBELL.

AS: His grandfather you were saying dad was the was involved in the Metropolitan police?
DC: He was on the mounted police yes the mounted side
AS: The mounted police? Yes so that means that's your great grandfather?
DC: Yes yes
AS: Was that before 1600 or?
DC: Ooh hoo! (laughter) 
Henry John CAMPBELL
 
229 02/13
Lewis's baptism record shows he was 2 months old when baptised on Jan 22nd 1797. This puts his birth year as 1796. 
Lewis Thomas CAMPBELL
 
230 02/13
Lewis's baptism record shows that his father (Lewis sr) was already dead by the time of his baptism.
The address given on Lewis's baptism record is "Harpers Walk". This was located off Lambeth High Street (http://london1868.com/weller54b.htm) where the International Maritime Organisation building is now located. A few lanes south of here was "Windmill Court", the Windmill pub still stands opposite where Windmill Court was. 
Lewis Thomas CAMPBELL
 
231 10/11
Unable to locate "Lewis CAMPBELL bc1872" in the 1911 census. 
Lewis W CAMPBELL
 
232 10/11
1861 census has one "Louisa CAMPBELL bc1839" born in Vauxhall, Lambeth. She is working in service. I have been unable to locate her parents on the 1861 census so perhaps they were now dead hence she is unmarried but not living with them.
Unable to locate Louisa CAMPBELL in any census beyond 1861. 
Louisa A CAMPBELL
 
233 02/08
EDavies data suggests:

MABEL CAMPBELL was born Abt. 1905. She married TONY LAGOURGI?LIGURI.

Children of MABEL CAMPBELL and TONY LAGOURGI?LIGURI are:
i. JOE LAGOURGI?LIGURI.
ii. ALICE LAGOURGI?LIGURI.

ALICE LAGOURGI?LIGURI (MABEL2 CAMPBELL, FREDERICK WILLIAM1) She married JACK PIKE?.

Children of ALICE LAGOURGI?LIGURI and JACK PIKE? are:
i. JANET4 PIKE?.
ii. SANDIE PIKE?.
 
Mabel CAMPBELL
 
234 03/15
1911 census records that Marian had borne two children with one still surviving. 
Maria CAMPBELL
 
235 10/11
Unable to locate "Sidney H CAMPBELL bc1870" beyond the 1891 census. 
Sidney H CAMPBELL
 
236 02/13
There is a James CAMPBELL recorded in "London Metropolitan Archives, Saint Mary Magdalene, Woolwich, Register of baptisms, birth, Jan 1800 - Dec 1812, P97/MRY, Item 010."
born 29/06/1800 to a William and Margaret CAMPBELL. Although this birth date falls into the narrow window that William and Margaret were married before her death, the location of Woolwich is a long way East of their Shadwell home. Additional evidence is needed to verify that this James CAMPBELL is the son of "our" William and Margaret.

Likewise, there is a Margaret CAMPBELL recorded in "London Metropolitan Archives, Saint Mary Magdalene, Woolwich, Register of baptisms, birth, Jan 1800 - Dec 1812, P97/MRY, Item 010." born 06/06/1802 to a William and Margaret CAMPBELL. Again a possible descendent though more evidence required. 
William CAMPBELL
 
237 07/07
Research suggests that a relation of Frederick was William Campbell... a former winner of the Doggetts Coat and Badge race, and thus a Freeman of the City of London.
Doggetts Coat and Badge race winners:
1850 Campbell, William. District - Westminster
http://parishregister.com/winners.html

Thomas Doggett established a prize for watermen in their first year of apprenticeship, to be raced for on the Tideway in London (August 1), that is now one of the oldest, continually running athletic contests in the world. The Coat and Badge that were awarded brought fame, though little fortune, to the wearers, who were also eligible to man the Royal Barge on state occasions. http://www.rowinghistory.net/Time%20Line/TL%20-1849images.htm

Extract from recorded interview with Douglas CAMPBELL (DC) and his wife Irene (IC) in 1984:
DC: All I do know is my fathers' grandfather was a freeman of London!
IC: Were they the lighter-men? Coz Mum had lighter-men on the Thames some of her relatives weren't they?
DC: Yes, I know some are
DC: All I know is he was freeman of London I know, coz dad could have had that coz he was the eldest son.
IC: One of your mums children could have gone to the cap n gown school couldn't they?
DC: Yeah
IC: And in fact they got given a place
DC: You mean, Christ's College.
IC: Yes. Your mum called it the "cap n gown school"!
DC: Yes.
IC: You know the way she talked about these things!
DC: Yeah I don't know if you ever seen them they wore yellow stockings and.. or red stockings and a long cloak.
AS: They still do??
DC: Yes they still do! It's a college in London for children of the freemen of the city and all that you know?
JS: The freemen of the city that as you say can be passed on can it to your next...?
DC: It could ha' done yes.
JS: Why wasn't it?
DC: Coz dad never
IC: Never bothered him he never bothered about anything did he?!
DC: No He wouldn't bother about anything like that
He didn't like any fuss or anything like that (laughter)
IC: Or any form filling in or anything like that! (laughter)
DC: No well I don't! (laughter)
AS: Now we know where dad gets it from! (laughter)
DC: Inconspicuous
IC: Yes that's right that's right that's just it!
DC: He didn't want to know
IC: that's just it!
AS: His grandfather you were saying dad was the was involved in the Metropolitan police?
DC: He was on the mounted police yes the mounted side
AS: The mounted police? Yes so that means that's your great grandfather?
DC: Yes yes
AS: Was that before 1600 or?
DC: Ooh hoo! (laughter)
AS: Perhaps not! And there's something about lighter-men on your side somewhere as well.
DC: Yes quite a few of them were lighter-men
AS: And is that where the freemen of the city came in?
DC: Probably
IC: Something to do with these barges down the Thames and its quite a small knit profession to be in. I mean its still carried on today. In fact you (inaudible)? the night
DC: You've heard of the Coat and Doggett people?
JS: The what?
DC: The Coat and Doggett. they have the races on the Thames
JS: Oh..
IC: And that's all to do with the lighter-mens relatives
DC: every year. Their all to do with in the olden days when Henry the VIII, and King Charles come down the Thames on barges well the lighter-man supplied the rowers. And they all had special uniforms the Cloak and Doggett badge. They wear a red hat and red cloak and gold braid Or a scarlet coat and gold braid. They are the lighter-men of London. And they supplied the oarsmen to the royal barges. Of course they don't do it now do they? But they still hold the race every year
IC: They still hold the racing and the tradition in the main's still goes on...

Thomas Doggett established a prize for watermen in their first year of apprenticeship, to be raced for on the Tideway in London (August 1), that is now one of the oldest, continually running athletic contests in the world. The Coat and Badge that were awarded brought fame, though little fortune, to the wearers, who were also eligible to man the Royal Barge on state occasions. http://www.rowinghistory.net/Time%20Line/TL%20-1849images.htm 
William CAMPBELL
 
238 10/11
1871 census has a possible "William G CAMPBELL, bc1841, Lambeth" (RG10 piece 603 folio 57 page 13). He is married to an Elizabeth, and working as a Dairyman? in Revel's Row, St George The Martyr, Southwark. 
William G CAMPBELL
 
239 03/15
1871 Census records - Mary Ann CAMPBELL bc1869 "Niece" living with William and Charlotte. (William's younger brother Joseph is also living with them - unmarried).
1881 Census records - Kate GUINN bc1865 in Marylebone; "Niece"; Scholar; living with William and Charlotte.
1901 Census records - Nellie TURPIN bc1876 in Battersea; "Boarder"; Embroideress; living with William and Letty. Letty's maiden name was TURPIN. 
William Henry CAMPBELL
 
240 03/15
1851 census records John HALFORD bc1831 (Hatter) - "Nephew" - living with William and Jane. 
William Morris CAMPBELL
 
241 09/11
Unable to locate "Alice CARLILE" in the 1901 census. 
Alice CARLILE
 
242 09/11
Unable to locate "Arabella CARLILE" on the 1911 census. 
Arabella CARLILE
 
243 11/08
Adrienne: I cannot find them on the 1901 census but I think I have found a death for a John Carlile between 1891 an 1901. Yet again I cannot find what happened to Matilda Mabbett or where she was after 1891 but her children with John Carlile would mean that they were half-sisters to Samuel Charles Heath because they had the same mother. 'Aunt Tilly' is on the wedding photograph of Edwin Charles Heath to Gladys.
 
John Henry CARLILE
 
244 09/11
Unable to locate "Mary CARLILE" on the 1901 census or beyond. 
Mary CARLILE
 
245 09/11
Unable to locate "Matilda CARLILE" on the 1901 census or beyond.

Adrienne has the birth certificate for daughter Matilda born on 7th April 1879 where she is named as Matilda Alice Mary, and mother is given as Matilda Alice Carlile, formerly Mabbett and father is John Carlile. This daughter is the 'Aunt' Tilly referred to elsewhere by Adrienne's mother.
Later in the 1891 census, eldest daughter Matilda A M M Carlile aged 12 by now not there. She is staying with Isabella Bennett aged 42 at 15 Bartley St Bedminster, Bristol.
Adrienne: Mum had also told me that 'Aunt'Tilly stayed with Arabella and went to a convent (probably a school ) in Redcatch St, Bristol. and my Aunt Beatie also mentioned Samuel Charles Heath's step sisters Tilly and Alice.
Aunt Tilly' is on the wedding photograph of Edwin Charles Heath to Gladys.
I know that Matilda A M M Carlile married a Sidney Bartlett and they had a daughter Doris in 1908 I think. 
Matilda Alice CARLILE
 
246 02/06
Email from Margaret Hill 13/02/06 "Then there is a photo of Stan on his own but also one of him and his wife Joan. (nee Charles). " 
Joan CHARLES
 
247 09/11
This daughter doesn't appear in any census beyond 1851. It appears that this first daughter might have been "Eliza". The second daughter then possible "Ellis". Then in the 1861 census it seems (judging by ages) that the first daughter is no longer recorded, her name "Eliza" has now been switched to the second daughter, and the third daughter is now named "Ellis H". This third daughter is later known as "Harriet" (perhaps the "H" in her 1861 name?). Unclear at this time, will require birth certificates. 
Elena CHILD
 
248 09/11
1881 and 1891 census records a "James CHILD, b1857, Bristol, a labourer in an iron works" living with wife "Martha, b Bristol" and daughter "Martha" in Oldham, Lancs. (RG11 piece 4084 folio 120 page 30). There is no record beyond 1891 for any of this family, perhaps they emigrated? 
James CHILD
 
249 09/11
Unable to locate "James CHILD" in the 1891 census or beyond. 
James CHILD
 
250 Oxford Road may well be the former name of modern day Oxford Street. It is in the area known as "The Dings" in St. Phillips and was an area of back to back terrace houses in the mid 1800's. Apparently the area was cleared ('slum clearance') in the 1930's and residents moved to new council estates in Knowle West and Bedminster. A new small council estate was built on the Dings.
 
James CHILD
 

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