Stantonetal - Stanton Genealogy

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Annie May HEATH

Annie May HEATH

Female 1892 - 1986  (94 years)

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  • Name Annie May HEATH  [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
    Born 26 May 1892  34 Brindley Street, St Mary Paddington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 9, 11
    Gender Female 
    Baptism 24 Jul 1892  St Paul, Harrow Road, Paddington, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [11
    Address 1901  2 Olveston Road, Bristol, Avon England Find all individuals with events at this location  [2, 3
    Address Abt 1907  The Vicarage, Church Street, St Ives, Cambridgeshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [12
    Occupation Abt 1907  [9, 12
    Kitchen Maid 
    Address 1911  Highclere, St Marys Avenue, Church End, Finchley, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [4
    Occupation 1911  [4
    Housemaid (Domestic) 
    Address 1914  3 Richmond Terrace, Queens Road, Bristol, Avon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [13
    Address:
    Home address 
    Address 31 Mar 1922  3 Richmond Terrace, Queens Road, Bristol, Avon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [14
    Address Abt 1923  34 Kingsdown Parade, Bristol, Avon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [13, 15
    Address Between 1928 and Feb 1941  82 Whitehall Road, Whitehall, Bristol, Avon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [9, 15, 16
    Address:
    Home address 
    Occupation 1940  Ministry of Food, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Address Feb 1941  153 Shirehampton Road, Sea Mills, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    Address Apr 1941  116 Portway, Sea Mills, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [8, 16
    Address:
    Home address 
    Address Mar 1943  118 Portway, Sea Mills, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [16
    Address:
    Home address 
    Address 1983  35 Garden Close, Sea Mills, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [6, 8, 9, 17
    Died 28 Nov 1986  Saffron House, Prospect Place, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 9, 18
    Cremated 4 Dec 1986  Canford Cemetery & Crematorium, Bristol, Avon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [9
    Person ID I5  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 27 Aug 2018 

    Father William Charles HEATH,   b. 26 Apr 1871, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Mary BEATON,   b. 24 Jun 1870, St Giles, Bloomsbury, London, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Mar 1930, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, Avon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 59 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 28 Jan 1889  St John the Evangelist, Hammersmith, London Find all individuals with events at this location  [8, 19
    St John the Evangelist Church Hammersmith London.jpg
    St John the Evangelist Church Hammersmith London.jpg
    Notes 
    • 07/06
      William married Mary Beaton (b.24/06/1870), St.Giles, Bloomsbury, Middlesex - Res. 3 Market St. Bloomsbury) on 28/01/1889 at St.John's, in Hammersmith, London., after Banns and witnessed by Fred John Manders and Louisa Groombridge.
    Family ID F27  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Frederick John STANTON,   b. 16 Feb 1882, St Mary's Parish, Southampton, Hampshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 Aug 1940, 82 Whitehall Road, Whitehall, Bristol, Avon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 58 years) 
    Married 4 Aug 1913  St Paul's Church, Bedminster, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [7, 8, 9, 10, 14, 20
    Children 
     1. Ronald Geoffrey STANTON,   b. 9 Jul 1914, Military Hospital, Devonport, Plymouth, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 May 2003, Kidderminster, Worcestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 88 years)  [natural]
     2. Clifford Leslie STANTON,   b. 12 Mar 1917, Bristol Maternity Hospital, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Dec 1974, Morchard Bishop, Devon, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years)  [natural]
     3. Mervyn Frederick STANTON,   b. 8 Feb 1921, Bristol Maternity Hospital, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Sep 2012, Manor Road, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 91 years)  [natural]
    Photos
    Annie Heath and George Thorne Wedding
    Annie Heath and George Thorne Wedding
    Last Modified 27 Aug 2018 
    Family ID F3  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 George Frederick THORNE,   b. 27 Nov 1880, Stapleton Road, Bristol, Gloucestershire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Mar 1965  (Age 84 years) 
    Married 12 Apr 1941  St Edyth's, Sea Mills, Bristol, England Find all individuals with events at this location  [5, 7, 8, 9
    • 01/15
      Marriage ceremony was conducted by Rev. Mervyn Stockwood.
    Thorne George Heath Annie Wedding 12 04 1941.jpg
    Thorne George Heath Annie Wedding 12 04 1941.jpg
    Thorne George and Annie Wedding
    Thorne George and Annie Wedding
    Thorne George Heath Annie 1942.jpg
    Thorne George Heath Annie 1942.jpg
    Last Modified 27 Aug 2018 
    Family ID F4  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Annie May Heath
    Annie May Heath
    Annie Heath and Mervyn Stanton
    Annie Heath and Mervyn Stanton
    Riette George Thorne and Annie Heath
    Riette George Thorne and Annie Heath
    Ruby Allen Andrew Stanton Annie Heath Riette
    Ruby Allen Andrew Stanton Annie Heath Riette
    Death Certificate
    Death Certificate
    Birth Certificate
    Birth Certificate
    Elisa and Jean Hannon, George and Annie May Thorne
    Elisa and Jean Hannon, George and Annie May Thorne
    Annie STANTON, Ron and Cliff 1918
    Annie STANTON, Ron and Cliff 1918
    Thorne George Heath Annie 1942.jpg
    Thorne George Heath Annie 1942.jpg
    STANTON Annie May and Ronald 1914
    STANTON Annie May and Ronald 1914
    At least one living or private individual is linked to this item - Details withheld.
    STANTON Annie May, Ron and Cliff 1917
    STANTON Annie May, Ron and Cliff 1917
    First family holiday Weymouth 1926
    First family holiday Weymouth 1926
    Annie May STANTON, Ron & Cliff 1920
    Annie May STANTON, Ron & Cliff 1920
    STANTON family at Weston 1919
    STANTON family at Weston 1919

  • Notes 
    • 11/08
      Account from Mervyn about a car accident involving Annie May and Fred, resulting in a pleasant stay with Essex Street relatives!
      A First Meeting with ‘Aunt Deb’ and Family - Extracted from “My Life in a Few Short Words . . . . . .”

      . . . .It was not long before Mum decided it was time that she should be able to make use of the family car. She had one or two initial driving lessons from Dad, but she began to lose her patience with him because he tended to tell her whenever she did something wrong! But, to be honest, she needed him to be with her until she became a proficient and safe driver because that was by now required by law (my Dad, for instance, when he started in 1927 never had to pass a test to be able to drive). But of course, cars were not so sophisticated in those days as they are today. In order to start the engine it was necessary first to set the required balance of choke (i.e. petrol) against the airflow through the carburettor. (Flooding the carburettor with petrol was all too common, and that meant waiting for some time for the excess petrol to disperse before you could try again). Control of the running of the engine was by means of manual manipulation of levers at the centre of the steering wheel, and their correct setting was a matter of judgement and experience (cars are now designed so that this is done automatically). Anyway all this technical stuff, together with the natural mix of excitement and apprehension tended to worry Mother somewhat, but she was still pretty determined to learn.
      It was during one of these learning sessions, early one evening after I had gone to bed, that she was rounding a bend in the road and found a horse and cart coming towards her on the other side. Unfortunately the horse took fright and reared up towards her, and she instinctively turned the steering wheel rather abruptly away in order to avoid hitting it. Even more unfortunately though, the car went through a stone wall and came to a halt with its front wheels hanging in space over a vegetable garden several feet below. The glass windscreen had shattered into sharp dagger-like pieces (as they did in those days) and one piece caused a nasty cut in Mother’s forehead, plus other smaller abrasions, and she was taken to hospital where she stayed for several days.
      Apparently the next morning, turning up late for school and quite upset, I gave my excuses to the teacher - “My Mum’s been and bashed into a wall!” Without further explanation Miss Dowsett must have been left wondering, her imagination in something of turmoil, until later on when she was able to discover that “My Mum” had been in a car!
      Luckily Dad was not injured and I think he was able to look after Ron and Cliff (my older brothers) at home, but arrangements were made for me to stay with Mother’s aunt, my great-aunt Deb, who lived in Essex Street, Bedminster.
      Other than being in hospital myself (for tonsils or something), this was the first time I had been away from home without my parents, but Aunt Deb, apart from being very small, and very old and wizened, was also very kind and welcoming and her family made a great fuss of me. I had never known Aunt Deb’s husband, Samuel Charles Heath (my grandfather’s brother), who had died many years before my visit. Apparently he had been a Registered Dairyman in Essex Street, Bedminster, where they lived, since their marriage in 1892 and she had finally taken the business over from him until 1918. Now she was living in retirement with a son and daughter. I still happily recall them all:
      At home there was Victor Emmanuel, unmarried, then 30ish, a postman after retirement from service in the Merchant Navy. There was also Dora, younger and jolly, and working at Wills’ cigarette factory in Bedminster. The eldest son, Edwin Charles, I think was married and living in his own accommodation by then, as were Arthur and Sydney. (Edwin I think was married to ‘Glad’ [Gladys]?). ‘Syd’, I remember well, was married to ‘Beat’ [Beatrice]; he was a Rep. for ‘George’s’ (later ‘Courage’) Breweries and apparently had developed the propensity for proving his loyalty to the Company by testing the alcoholic content of its output with every customer he would visit during his working day (much like his uncle, William Charles, my grandfather, who had been a steward with Campbell’s White Funnel Channel steamers - but surely Syd was not quite so brutal to his family as he!). (Syd and Beat later had a son, Brian) I once met Arthur, and later his wife (Laura, I believe she was), and thought them both very nice - I remember at some time they opened a Milk or Sandwich bar in High Street (in the middle of town) for a while. Apart from the pleasure of my meeting previously unknown relatives and giving my Mum a bit of a rest, I enjoyed my week or two with my Essex Street relatives, but, even more so, I was happy to be able to come home and have my brothers to annoy and occasionally argue with once again . . . .

      06/03
      Nan (Annie May Stanton - nee Heath). On her early life working as a kitchen maid in St Ives, Cambridge.
      Recorded December 1976.

      Conversation between Annie May Stanton (nee Heath) and daughter-in-law Ruby Stanton (nee Allen). Ruby speaking first.

      Right Nan. It's the 17th of December 1976. You are sitting knitting?.

      Yes? yes.

      I am cracking crab claws.

      So go on lets hear about St Ives.

      Oh alright well we've got to keep each other occupied somehow!
      Well I can go back to the Boer war?oh it comes to that! I can remember seeing the soldiers marching up Gloucester Road coming back and dragging their guns behind them.

      In Bristol?

      In Bristol this was yes.

      When I was 14 we moved to London from Bristol, Bert was 3 weeks old in long clothes when we went there.

      Was he?

      Yes.
      Well then I stayed home for a little while but I got a position as a kitchen maid in St Ives in Cambridge. ?.it was a vicarage, in a vicarage. But it was a very, very hard place there, the work was terrific, I used to have to kneel on the tops of the range to clean the flues out.

      How often did you do those?

      Oh about twice a week I had to 'cause they had great big ovens, very big ovens. If I got up too late after 6 o' clock I used to have to stand on the kitchen table to heat the water in a saucepan. Over an ordinary gas flame, the ordinary old fashioned flames you know? Oh I had to do that many a time.
      They had a lady's maid she used to come down 'bout 7 o' clock for the lady's bathwater and they used to have hip? baths in the bedroom, she used to have to bath?. and the gentleman only, was allowed to use the bathroom.

      They had a bathroom?

      Oh they had a bathroom yes, but only the gentleman was allowed to use it.

      It must have been very early days.

      Oh it was a beautiful vicarage, it was a huge vicarage, the staircase was a lovely one of those, lovely round staircases that when up? a big square hall. Be weren't allowed to use those stairs, we had the servants stairs to go up. Same as we had the servants hall where we had our meals, and never the same food as they had in the dining rooms, quite different food.

      Was it good food?

      Well it was good, but it was plain? but it was joint on Sunday and "done up" until Wednesday. Then we'd have another one on Thursday and that was "done up" until Saturday. But it was never what they had in the dining rooms, was always different what they had.

      What did they have in the dining room, can you remember?

      Well all sorts, they used to have a lot of their stuff up from the army and navy stores in London. Lobsters and things like that. And I always remember they used to drink a lot of "Salutarous" water? come up in bottles from the Army and Navy stores. I don't know what special water it was?. I s'pose it was some health water you know.
      Oh and they always dressed in the evenings in evening dress, with trains! This is a vicar's wife mind and her mother, Mrs Hamilton-Bell was her mothers name, but I can't remember the vicars name. But they were oh? really gentry they must have been because? She had a son that was a major in the army at Aldershot. And he had about one of the first, I should think, motor cars that ever came out, one of those very, very high ones. And the chauffer that he had was a soldier, and he was a married man with 7 children. When he used to bring him up, he [the chauffer] used to be ever so sorry for me he said he would never let one of his girls go into service. I used to have to work from 6 o'clock in the morning to 10 o' clock? 10 half past at night. Course it used to take me ages to wash up the dinner things!

      What time did you have off?

      Oh?. erm..

      No unions then!

      No, No! One half day, one Sunday afternoon, a fortnight. And then I was just allowed to go out for a walk you know and back again and that was all I had. Eight pounds a year was my pay?. Eight pounds a year, I used to get that monthly. And I don't know what could have happened but I must have been I suppose a little bit saucy to the cook and she made a complaint to me to the lady in the?. I had to go into the dining room when this was reported. But I can always remember, course as a youngster naturally I burst out crying? and I said and it was very unkind of Elizabeth to tell tales about me!

      You can remember saying that?!

      Yes! I can remember so well saying it, just like it was only yesterday!
      It was a lovely place, they had a gardener there and an under-gardener. Oh! it was a beautiful kitchen garden. And when he came, he used to come in with the vegetables, every day fresh vegetables, he was awfully kind to me, he always used to bring me in some? either some peaches or apricots in his pocket and he'd quietly give them to me. I used to take them up in my bedr? My bedroom was up three flights of stairs! A little attic room, with just bare boards in it which I used to have to scrub.

      Did you have to share it or was it your own?

      Yes I used to share it with a house maid.

      Really "upstairs downstairs"!

      Yes, yes. The lady's maid she had a special room outside Mrs Hamilton-Bell's bedroom. I used to have to practically wait on her with different things. In the mornings before 8 o'clock I had to do three fireplaces, the study, the dining room and the drawing room fireplaces.

      And that was clear out the ashes first?and then?. ?

      Oh yes, all that sort of thing. And then there were three bedrooms upstairs to do, their bedrooms 'cause they all had fires up there you see. So it was all fires everywhere. And the kitchen range I used to have to see to that. But oh it was a terribly big? But what I used to enjoy most of all was when I used to have to wash up was to scrape up the?. 'Cause I was so hungry you know I didn't have enough food a growing youngster. Used to like to scrape out the lovely sauces that she used to make, with anchovy sauce and all that sort of thing.

      Still do it now!



      Well it used to be lovely there I used to enjoy that! Of course they had all the luxury's that you could possibly have that you? today you know. I don't think that he had any pay at that vicarage I think it was a private living really. Because they always seemed to have plenty of money.
      I remember they had a jumble sale once, and they put some lovely things, and they used to wear those boa's, the lady's maid used to make a lot of things for them and she used to make those boas, in like "fissues", and all that sort of thing. And they were made of net the boa's and then she'd have long silk ribbons you know hanging down from it. 'Cause trains on their dresses to everything. And the lady's maid got rid of a navy blue skirt once, she said would I like this navy blue skirt. And when I went home finally, I was really?. I told my mother if I couldn't leave I was going to run away, and I'd been there six months then. And when I went home and my mother met me at Walham Green, we lived at Fulham, she met me at Walham Green station she had a shock! I had a navy blue skirt with a train on it!

      Oh dear!

      How old were you then?

      Fifteen!

      I must have looked terrible. When she told me about it you know after years about it? but when she saw me with this skirt on, and I forget, I think I had an like an ordinary motor hat on and, you know a straw hat that they used to wear then. But I always remember I thought I was quite a lady with this train you know, I thought it was absolutely wonderful to have, especially as it was one that the lady's maid used to wear. But oh... I used to have to do the lady's maids room and make her bed. And I know one morning she caught me... I used to just throw the bedclothes over! She said you set that bed and make it properly you know, and I was so disappointed because I often just used to throw the things over and cover them up, you know! It was wicked you know the way that they made you? just for eight pounds a year.

      It's ridiculous isn't it?

      Yes. Terrible you know really. 'Cause, as they said you had your food? such as it was. But you couldn't help yourself to anything, it was just given to you what there was on the table, but it was very, very rigid.
      There was a butler, they had a butler that when I first went there, the butler had been to the Boer war and he'd picked up drink. And one evening they wanted the shutters put across in the drawing room, and he wasn't there. And he wasn't there? he wasn't there to put these shutter over. And he'd gone down the end of the drive, down there was a little pub at the end, and he wanted a drink. He did it two or three times. Well somebody must have split on him, and he came? they had him on the carpet about it it was quite a to-do, and they gave him the sack. But then they had another one and he was a very quaint fellow. Course when we went to church we had to file in, we had our own row, we had to file in, and when I first went there I hadn't any gloves. I was pulled up because I didn't have no gloves to wear to church. And he? it was, it was summertime, it was a very sunny day one Sunday, and he thought he'd go to church with a straw hat on. Oh he was pulled up on the carpet? butlers should always wear a bowler hat! Wasn't allowed to wear a straw hat! But oh it was very, very rigid with everything that was there, what we had to do. I just was? really I got to that state that I should have run away from the place. I wrote to Mother and tell her I couldn't come home, I intended running away.

      And was there any reaction to your leaving?

      They took back the old kitchen maid that left previously. She'd gone somewhere else, she was an older girl. I was really too young for the job actually, because it was such a great big stone kitchen. I was supposed to get on my hands and knees and scrub the floor but I couldn't do it! I wasn't? I couldn't get the work done in time with everything that was there, what with the washing up, loads and loads of washing up as I say I used to be washing? and I can remember one occasion when the chauffer came with the major once. He came out to help me, it was about 10 o'clock, and all this washing up I had to do, he came out? but the cook came out and told him "No look that's her job" he said, "Leave her alone" he said, "You come away from it." Oh and he used to feel so sorry for me, you know, he said "I'd never let a girl of mine go to service." Said "It's terrible?" Still! I mean I learnt a lot? it's all experience, I learnt a lot from that. I had some marvellous places of ? in London after that. Came back to London, and of course, there you were well respected and you were treated more as one of the family.

      You preferred London to the provinces.

      Oh yes, yes. It was absolutely marvellous there, because the last place I had was wonderful. And I left home then? I left there to come home with Mother you see because my father had gone away then. And I came back then, and then I went to a place in Bristol but I left at the end and I wouldn't take a place in Bristol, not after London, because you were one of the family in London you were really respected. In fact you had quite a job to get a decent job in London, unless you were well recommended. But in all events I did very well there, my last place was very nice, we always had our glass of Port was sent out to us on a Sunday you know, very, very nice they were to us.
      That Christmas, I left at the end of the year, and the girls were away at boarding school, and of course when they used to come home at Christmas there was a lot to do. They didn't take another maid in my place, there were four maids there, and they didn't take another maid in my place, or she couldn't get one that was suitable. And they sent and asked me if I would come just for the Christmas, while the children were home from boarding school.

      And did you?

      I went back there, yes. And they were very nice about it, in fact she really wanted me to stay on again but you see, I had to think of Mother and go back with her because she

      She was left on her own? with how many of you at home?

      Seven? I was

      You were the oldest but one?

      No I was the oldest?.

      You were the oldest?

      I was the oldest of seven. And Bert you see was only three.

      He was the youngest?

      Yes, he was the youngest. So of course I had to go home to help swell things you know and keep things? Of course Bert and even Mabel didn't know their father. And of course I? took it all in my stride because I was helping Mother. But I had to help keep them you see, while I was in my job. And with Mother, of course poor Mother she had to go out to work. We had a very hard childhood especially myself, and well even Lily I suppose to a certain extent, it was very hard? but we were very happy in our ignorance, and we always kept our pride. We kept our pride and of course Mother always had? there was a certain culture in Mother, which

      Seemed to come through?

      Yes. Seemed to come through and developed in the family as it's grown along. Course I often say how proud she would be of me today. She'd be so proud if she could see each of

      And her grandchildren

      And the grandchildren. How wonderfully they've got on. And through their own merit!

      They've worked.

      I mean we've done our share to help as parents and done what we could. But, as regards the family as concerned, they're absolute credit and it's wonderful really. When I look back, I'm looking back now. You know I'm nearly 85. And I'm looking back all those years and when I think back of the struggle we had and yet how independent we were, and to see them today it's absolutely wonderful.

      And yet you've come through.

      Come through yes! And thank God for it!

      06/03
      Nan (Annie May Stanton - nee Heath). Air raid on 82 Whitehall Road, Bristol. Recorded Christmas 1978.

      Must just tell you an incident a couple of months after your father died, we started having the heavy air raids. We had a very bad in the November, and we caught the biggest blast of it in our house. We had the roof blown off, all the windows out. Luckily we were in the shelter because the sirens used to go at night. In fact for a fortnight we used to rush down and take our tea down there and stay down there all night! Then a fortnight afterwards we had another heavy raid which took the back roof off! And I was saying to the boys "Oh be quiet I can't hear anything!" because they were larking about, and I said "What's that funny noise going on?" And when I looked out it was fire- bombs were falling everywhere! So out jumps Clifford as quick as lightening? I never seen such a thing in my life he was marvellous! Out? over a high wall into the next house, there was a fire bomb on the roof there, luckily they were away, they'd left their back door open in case of fire. Clifford went up into the back bedroom which was ablaze with a fire bomb that had dropped on the bed. He picked up the mattress bodily, told Mervyn to push the window open, and threw this mattress out alight, blazing, out into the garden. And the bomb then had dropped into some blankets under the bed, which was in a box under the bed, and that was alight, and the chest of drawers in the room.
      So in all events they had a stirrup pump and they brought a bucket of water with them, and got it out after about an hour. Next door to us again, was a garage, full of paint stuff and that was all on fire! So you can guess the state I was in. I was screaming out in the road "Fire! Fire!" and an unknown soldier came running round the corner and he said "For God's sake Mrs get inside theres stuff falling everywhere!" But I said my two boys are upstairs and the house is on fire! He went rushing up? then when he came down he said "They're alright" he said "They're looking after that" and he said "Go in your shelter ma'am! Go in your shelter!" and it didn't cross my mind to look at my place, to go inside my house at all. I had Ron's furniture, some of his furniture which he has got here to this present day. I had the in middle room more than half of his home and my own home, I didn't think to look inside but, when I think back now I think now that that was one of God's works. That nothing happened to our place at all, but either side was on fire with these fire-bombs. It was an absolute revelation when I think of it.

  • Sources 
    1. [S9] Birth Certificate, HEATH, Annie May; 1892.

    2. [S51] Third Party Tree Documents and Histories, HEATH, Annie May;.
      Document attached as described "HEATH Annie May Alveston Road memories from Mervyn 110706"

    3. [S2] 1901 Census, HEATH, William Charles; & family; RG13 piece 2398 folio 70 page 6.
      Name Relation Condition Sex Age Birth Year Occupation Disability Where Born

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      HEATH, William C Head Married M 30 1871 Cycle Agent Bristol Gloucestershire
      HEATH, Mary Wife Married F 30 1871 Bloomsbury London
      HEATH, Annie M Daughter Single F 8 1893 Paddington London
      HEATH, Albert S Son Single M 6 1895 Bedminster Bristol Gloucestershire
      HEATH, Lillian M Daughter Single F 4 1897 Bedminster Bristol Gloucestershire
      HEATH, Edith F Daughter Single F 1 1900 Bedminster Bristol Gloucestershire
      WILDING, Florence L Boarder Single F 19 1882 Boot Machinest Bristol Gloucestershire

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      RG number: RG13
      Piece: 2398
      Folio: 70
      Page: 6

      Registration District: Bristol
      Sub District: Ashley
      Enumeration District: 4
      Ecclesiastical Parish: Horfield Holy Trinity
      Civil Parish: Bristol
      Municipal Borough:
      Address: 2, (Or Olveston), Alveston Road, Bristol
      County: Gloucestershire

    4. [S31] 1911 Census, HEATH, Annie May; bc1892; RG14PN7173 RG78PN352 RD131 SD3 ED15 SN163.
      Name Relation Condition/Yrs married Sex Age Birth Year Occupation Where Born

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      DELANY, Mary Ellen Servant Single F 24 1887 Cook Domestic Middlesex Parish of Hackney
      HEATH, Annie May Servant Single F 18 1893 Housemaid Domestic Middlesex Parish of Paddington
      KIRK, Ethel Ennie Servant Single F 22 1889 Parlourmaid Domestic Parish of Woolwich

      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      RG number: RG14
      Piece: 7173
      Reference: RG14PN7173 RG78PN352 RD131 SD3 ED15 SN163

      Registration District: Barnet
      Sub District: Finchley
      Enumeration District: 15
      Parish: Finchley
      Address: Highclere St Marys Avenue Finchley
      County: Middlesex

    5. [S60] BMD Index, STANTON, Annie May; b1892; THORNE, George; b1880; Marriage Index; England & Wales, Marriage Index: 1916-2005.
      Name: Annie M Stanton
      Spouse Surname: Thorne
      Date of Registration: Apr-May-Jun 1941
      Registration district: Bristol
      Inferred County: Gloucestershire, Somerset
      Volume Number: 6a
      Page Number: 413

    6. [S34] Papers - STANTON, Ronald Geoffrey, Ronald Stanton, HEATH, Annie; b1892; Letter; 1983.
      Digitised Record
      Two letters to her son Ronald on the death of his wife Ruby

    7. [S34] Papers - STANTON, Ronald Geoffrey, Ronald Stanton, Significant dates.

    8. [S34] Papers - STANTON, Ronald Geoffrey, Ronald Stanton, General Information.
      Includes:
      ALLEN
      HEATH
      THORNE
      FLETCHER
      Early Trees
      Old Address Book (undated) (unscanned)

    9. [S34] Papers - STANTON, Ronald Geoffrey, Ronald Stanton, HEATH, Annie May; Eulogy.
      See attached document

    10. [S40] Military Records, STANTON, Frederick John; b1882; Military Service; Royal Artillery attestations 1883-1942.
      First name(s) Frederick John
      Last name Stanton
      Age 19
      Birth year 1882
      Birth place Southampton
      Service number 1400706
      Former service number 7504
      Attestation year 1901
      Record set Royal Artillery attestations 1883-1942
      Category Military, armed forces & conflict
      Record collection Regimental & service records
      Collections from Great Britain

    11. [S120] London, England, Church of England Births and Baptisms, 1813-1906, Ancestry.com, (Name: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc.; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 2010;), HEATH, Annie May; b1892; Baptism;.
      Name: Annie Mary Heath Record Type: Baptism Baptism Date: 24 Jul 1892 Father's Name: William Charles Heath Mother's Name: Mary Heath Parish or Poor Law Union: Paddington St Paul Borough: Westminster Register Type: Parish Registers

    12. [S86] HEATH, Annie May, Interview by Ruby ALLEN, 17/12/1976.

    13. [S51] Third Party Tree Documents and Histories, STANTON, Mervyn; "3 Richmond Terrace";.
      Memories of 3 Richmond Terrace in attached document

    14. [S34] Papers - STANTON, Ronald Geoffrey, Ronald Stanton, "My Father"; STANTON, Frederick John; b1882.
      Documented by Ronald STANTON.
      Includes:
      - "My Father"
      - MOD Military Service Record
      - Background Comment (by Mervyn and Michelle STANTON re Military Service Records) - scan not included as is initial draft of "STANTON, Frederick John; "FJS Comments" (Mervyn Stanton)" in Third Party Tree Documents and Histories source file.
      - Rough Notes ("My Father")

    15. [S34] Papers - STANTON, Ronald Geoffrey, Ronald Stanton, "Addresses during lifetime".

    16. [S38] Papers - HEATH, Annie May, HEATH, Annie May;.
      Letters from Annie May HEATH to her son Ronald STANTON

    17. [S34] Papers - STANTON, Ronald Geoffrey, Ronald Stanton, Letters; Mervyn & Riette.
      Letters (unscanned). Manually reviewed before destruction to maintain privacy.
      Any facts related to this source will require seperate verification, however this (primary) reference should provide a firm indicator of the fact.

    18. [S35] Death Certificate, HEATH, Annie May; 1986.

    19. [S12] Marriage Certificate, HEATH, William Charles; & BEATON, Mary; 1889;.
      Mervyn has a photo-copy of the Marriage Certificate, No. 340, issued in the Parish of St. John the Evangelist, Hammersmith, Middlesex, on 28 January, 1889, recording Marriage, after Banns, between :
      William Charles HEATH, 19, Bachelor, (Ship's) Steward, 33 Cardross Street, Father John Charles HEATH,
      and
      Mary BEATON, 19, Spinster, - 33 Cardross Street, Father John George BEATON.
      (Witnessed in the presence of Fred John Manders and Louisa Groombridge).
      The copy was one I received from a cousin whose mother was, like my Mum, a daughter of William Charles, so, as you say we have not much doubt about the authenticity of the record.

      Copy from London Metropolitan Archives, P80/JN/A/02/003 attached:
      NAME: Mary Beaton
      ESTIMATED BIRTH YEAR: abt 1870
      AGE: 19
      SPOUSE: William Charles Heath
      SPOUSE AGE: 19
      RECORD TYPE: Marriage
      EVENT DATE: 28 Jan 1889
      PARISH: St John the Evangelist, Hammersmith
      BOROUGH: Hammersmith and Fulham
      FATHER NAME: John George Beaton
      SPOUSE FATHER: John Charles Heath
      REGISTER TYPE: Parish Register

    20. [S60] BMD Index, STANTON Frederick J & HEATH, Annie May; Marriage; 1913; FreeBMD. England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index: 1837-1915 [database on-line].
      Name: Frederick J Stanton
      Spouse Surname: Heath
      Date of Registration: Jul-Aug-Sep 1913
      Registration district: Bristol
      Inferred County: Gloucestershire
      Volume Number: 6a
      Page Number: 49